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[1] Which is immortality gained by a subject through scientific achievement in this life, rather than being granted by a deity in an afterlife as thought of by the theists; I will refer to this as ‘Secular Immortality’.

[2] Which is not simply somethings function. If I want to know the function of a thing, I could list out the things it is capable of doing, like a tool does X, Y & Z. In order to understand purpose on the other hand, I would have to ask why something is being done, which is to look at the intentions of the task at hand. 

[3] If something is significant it is then worthy of attention or of great importance – Anonymous, “Significant”, Merriam Webster (2018) <https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/significant>, accessed 13 April 2018

[4] Anonymous, “Meaningful”, Merriam Webster (2018) <https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/meaningful>, accessed 13 April 2018

[5] There are examples of individuals who do live in isolation, but this is very rarely the case and often is a choice made by the individual. It is something they still find meaningful, (For example, the hermit yogi that lives in a cave for reasons pertaining to the spiritual).

[6] However, it is important to note here that it says nothing about whether the meaningful life is good or evil. Something being meaningful does not necessarily make the one who gives rise to meaning benevolent. I will confront this problem and expand on it later in this essay. 

[7] Although these desires are also shared by everyone in a community, and so can rightfully be considered shared desires which must be fulfilled for all.

[8] T. Chappell, ‘Infinity Goes Up On Trial: Must Immortality Be Meaningless?’, European Journal of Philosophy, 17/1 (2007), p. 34

[9] ibid.., p.35

[10] For more information on what makes a meaningful life, read the following article: E.M. Adams, ‘The Meaning of Life’, International Journal for Philosophy of Religion, 51/2 (2002), pp. 71-81

[11] Anonymous, “immortal”, Merriam Webster (2018) <https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/immortal>, accessed 13 April 2018

[12] Anonymous, ‘The Homeric Hymns and Homerica’, Homeric Hymns, Trans. by H.G. Evelyn-White, Harvard University Press (1914), 218 ff – <http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=HH%205>

[13] Although an interesting point to raise here is that it is still possible for him to use his imagination, and if he has lost his mind enough to believe that what he imagines is real, he may still have an opportunity to experience a meaningful life. But this is a questionable hypotheses.

[14] That is, in any secular or materialist understanding of immortality that assumes the requirement of a body for the existence of life. Unlike the idea that immortality is attained through an eternally living soul, believed by such thinkers as Descartes.

[15] J. Sisson, ‘Heat death, cosmic’, Encyclopedia of time: science, philosophy, theology, & culture, ed. by H.J, (California: SAGE Publications, 2009), pp. 637

[16] A.W. Moore, ‘Williams, Nietzsche, and the Meaninglessness of Immortality’, Mind, 115/458 (2006), p.328

[17] ibid.., p. 314

Bibliography

– Anonymous, “immortal”, Merriam Webster (2018) <https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/immortal>, accessed 13 April 2018

– Anonymous, “Meaningful”, Merriam Webster (2018) <https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/meaningful>, accessed 13 April 2018

– Anonymous, “Significant”, Merriam Webster (2018) <https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/significant>, accessed 13 April 2018

– Anonymous, ‘The Homeric Hymns and Homerica’, Homeric Hymns, Trans. by H.G. Evelyn-White, Harvard University Press (1914), 218 ff – <http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=HH%205

A.W. Moore, ‘Williams, Nietzsche, and the Meaninglessness of Immortality’, Mind, 115/458 (2006), pp. 311-330

– E.M. Adams, ‘The Meaning of Life’, International Journal for Philosophy of Religion, 51/2 (2002), pp. 71-81

– J. Sisson, ‘Heat death, cosmic’, Encyclopedia of time: science, philosophy, theology, & culture, ed. by H.J, (California: SAGE Publications, 2009), pp. 637

– T. Chappell, ‘Infinity Goes Up On Trial: Must Immortality Be Meaningless?’, European Journal of Philosophy, 17/1 (2007), pp. 30-44

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